27 May 2008

The mystery of Stonehenge

Never say that scientists should not use their imagination, but only physical data. If they had done that we wouldn't have a clue. Of course it had something to do with religion. We are hard-wired for that sort of thing, right from the beginning of the Big Bang. Check out the latest National Geographic, still the best magazine for the money. And Wikipedia of course.

A friend and her mother visited us when we lived in England in the 70s, the 1970s that is. I excitedly showed them Stonehenge sometime in March or April, usually cold and windy in those parts. Not wanting to hurt my feelings they said nothing when we got home. Later I learned that the only comment that Irma, the mother of our friend Sharon, made when out of earshot was, "What was all that stone crap about?" It is much more comfortable reading about it in National Geographic, but only because we've been on the site. It reminds me of watching a cricket match on the TV. No one would have a clue what was happening unless you had actually spent a little time in the middle with someone fairly close by running and hurling a hard red ball at your private parts. Then and only then can one appreciate what is happening on the TV.

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